Microreview: I don't like the rules, I like this game.

Smudge Skittle Alys Longley 4
Smudge Skittle by Alys Longley, https://smudgeskittle.com/
Smudge Skittle Alys Longley 3
Smudge Skittle by Alys Longley, https://smudgeskittle.com/
Smudge Skittle Alys Longley 1
Smudge Skittle by Alys Longley, https://smudgeskittle.com/
Smudge Skittle Alys Longley 2
Smudge Skittle by Alys Longley, https://smudgeskittle.com/
Date
2024 March
Subtitle
Francisco González Castro reviews Alys Longley: Smudge Skittle: A little inventory of resources entangling creative practice research and writing. University of Auckland, 2018.
Type
microreview
Author / Publisher
Francisco González Castro for NewsLibrary
Author Info

Francisco González Castro (Santiago, Chile) lives in Austin, Texas. He works as an artist and writer, he is autistic, anarchist and Nietzschean, and spends most of his time playing and reading. His favorite activity is sex.

Language

English

Also published here

Newsletter No. 60

Instagram @sarn_switzerland

Reviewed Publication

Alys Longley: Smudge Skittle: A little inventory of resources entangling creative practice research and writing. Design by Alys Longley and Jeffrey Holdaway. University of Auckland, 2018.

I open the Smudge Skittle. Inside are 120 cards. I read the first one: the cards invite artistic and reflective tasks for creative research. The second: acknowledgements. The third: rules. You must create them. I take a card at random. It says: '3.6 Complete cards 3.3 / 3.4' and there is a reflection about movement and the sensation of the body in relation to gravity. The 3.4 tells me to complete 3.3 and close my eyes and take 3 breaths. Card 3.3 tells me to stand up and align myself with gravity, noticing the symmetry of my body. I do the tasks. I have never liked these exercises; I think they install the idea that the body is 'more present' when one moves or 'notices' it: there is always body. But I am alone, and I play the game. I think about imbalances and how that generates movement. I throw the cards on the floor and take another one: '7.1 Write with associative thinking―in which one idea unfolds organically into the next idea, without a prescribed path'. I read what I wrote, it is organic, without a pre-established path: mission accomplished. I think, why not let chance be the engine of research and creation, two games that do not need the rules we have imposed on them.